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MetroTwit: Designing the UI

A number of people have asked how exactly do we go about design the UI for MetroTwit, what it takes for a feature/idea to make it from a tweet/email to us to a release.

Our process is fairly simple... we fight... like brothers (we're all in separate states so our fights are over WLM/Skype). That may sound like a bad way to design but it means we are actively fleshing out the details from each of our perspectives and experiences and our shared understanding of the outcome we're trying to achieve.

Quite often there is no fight, we all agree on exactly how something should be implemeneted and it's recorded for when we get to actually programming that feature. On the rare occasion it comes down to a majority vote as to how something should look/act. Usually when we get to this stage we've already asked numerous people for their opinions or had user polls etc.

When it comes down to the exact design (the pixels that we know you all peek at when you change MetroTwit themes... you monsters) usually when coding a feature Winston (@winstonpang) and I will do the basic design/make it

MetroTwit: The 'Oh Crap' factor (Part 2)

As any astute reader might be able tell (for the 2 people that read this post) this post is a tad late... almost a year late.

So what happened? I will admit I'm fairly lazy when it comes to blogging, but mostly we let this little twitter app that turned out pretty cool go out into the big wide world and found ourselves in what I like to call the 'Oh Crap' period of doing something new.

A lot has happened since Part 1 of this story, we went from a very small alpha of about 25 people to opening open MetroTwit to the public with over 800 users registering to be notified of the beta.

Of course we were wise enough to release the beta in a nice quiet period in our lives so we could easily get bugs fixed and out to all the new users from a lot of different countries. Except we didn't. We released the MetroTwit beta during the Microsoft ReMix 2010 Conference in Melbourne while were attending sessions and 'networking' events at night. Over the 2 days of Remix we released 6 new versions of MetroTwit to combat all kinds of issues with Non-latin

The making of MetroTwit : The Big Bang (Part 1)

It was a sunny Saturday Morning on the 27 March 2010 when I got up to check my daily RSS Feeds. I found a post from Long’s IStartedSomething site with a screenshot of his idea for a Metro-inspired Twitter Client with the hope of making it an awesome Silverlight Out of Browser app. (See the original post here MetroTwit: a Metro-inspired Windows twitter client)

My first thoughts were cool, I reckon I could smack together that UI in Blend (I’ve done plenty of mashing xaml in Blend as I’ve always learnt better with the raw Xaml than the UI tools). My background is not in .NET Apps, I’ve been to many MS conferences and played with a lot of .NET ‘Stuff’ but never created a production application.

I figured I’d leave it to other .NET Developers but I’d see what I could throw together. By that afternoon I had the basic layouts and design of a Silverlight Application starting to happen with the main window when Long woke up and came online.

After sending Long a quick copy of where I was up to, we decided this project might actually be a goer. When

The making of MetroTwit : The Big Bang (Part 1)

It was a sunny Saturday Morning on the 27 March 2010 when I got up to check my daily RSS Feeds. I found a post from Long’s IStartedSomething site with a screenshot of his idea for a Metro-inspired Twitter Client with the hope of making it an awesome Silverlight Out of Browser app. (See the original post here MetroTwit: a Metro-inspired Windows twitter client)

My first thoughts were cool, I reckon I could smack together that UI in Blend (I’ve done plenty of mashing xaml in Blend as I’ve always learnt better with the raw Xaml than the UI tools). My background is not in .NET Apps, I’ve been to many MS conferences and played with a lot of .NET ‘Stuff’ but never created a production application.

I figured I’d leave it to other .NET Developers but I’d see what I could throw together. By that afternoon I had the basic layouts and design of a Silverlight Application starting to happen with the main window when Long woke up and came online.

After sending Long a quick copy of where I was up to, we decided this project might actually be a goer. When